ACCOMPLISHMENTS

teamYuma Proving Ground (YPG) Site Visit
Four Green Launch team members (photo L-R: John Hunter, Don Whitney, Steve Kane, Rob Fryer) visited YPG on October 18 through 20, 2016. Major activities included discussions with YPG staff on support available, tour and selection of optimum range sites for horizontal and vertical firing, video inspection of tube interior (looks good!), and painting exterior of tube white.

Dr. John Hunter on the radio The Space Show
John gave a detailed overview of Green Launch plans to demonstrate the practical application of economical impulse launch to space. The format was a live interview with Dr. David Livingston and aired on October 9, 2016.

http://www.thespaceshow.com/show/09-oct-2016/broadcast-2791-dr.-john-hunter

Facebook Page
An early version is now on line. Please check it out periodically for updates and new material. Link:
https://www.facebook.com/ImpulseLaunch/

PowerPoint
A Power Point overview of the Green Launch vision has been developed to be posted on the webpage and other media. The 27-page briefing includes the heritage of similar programs, performance expectations, and the business case for impulse launch.

WORK IN PROGRESS

gl-2YPG Testing Contract
Green Launch prepared and delivered our plan of activities for testing to the YPG Test Directorate. The contract for YPG services and range use is now in review with government contract staff. Expect final signatures in December 2016.

Website
A contract has been signed with ZENTHREE to develop a website for Green Launch. Please check it out periodically for updates and new material. Expect activation by end of November or early December 2016. Link: http://GreenLaunch.org

Kickstarter Campaign
Additional funding will be required beyond the amounts pledged by team members, family and friends. We plan to use social media funding to generate the rest. The campaign description, rewards, and other details are now in development. Expect start date in January 2017.

Small Payload Design Demonstration
Rob Fryer has been experimenting with small off-the-shelf commercial components which can be assembled into our expected early payload volume of a cylinder approximately 1 ¼ inch diameter by 4 inches long. These components can be programed from a laptop computer to perform various functions.